IJPR.2017.149

Type of Article:  Original Research

Volume 5; Issue 3 (June 2017)

Page No.: 2095-2100

DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.16965/ijpr.2017.149

CONSTRAINT INDUCED MOVEMENT THERAPY AND REAL-WORLD ARM USE IN CHILDREN WITH HEMIPARESIS

Asmaa Osama Sayed *1, Hebatallah Mohamed Kamal 1, Nagham Mohamed Kamal Khalil 2.

1 Department of Physical Therapy for Growth and Developmental Disorders in Children and It’s Surgery, Faculty of Physical Therapy, Cairo University, Egypt.

2 Physical therapy department at El-Raml Children Hospital,Master degree in physical therapy, Cairo University, Egypt.

Address for Correspondence: Dr. Asmaa Osama Sayed, Lecturer, Department of Physical Therapy for Growth and Developmental Disorders in Children and It’s Surgery, Faculty of Physical Therapy, Cairo University, Egypt. E-Mail:  drasmaaosama@yahoo.com

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Constraint Induced Movement therapy is a rehabilitative technique used in physical rehabilitation that restrains the sound arm to improve the functional ability of the affected upper extremityThis study was conducted to explain the effect of constraint induced movement therapy on functional use of spastic arm in hemiparetic cerebral palsied children.

Materials and Methods: The study was conducted on thirty children with spastic hemiparesis of both sexes (seventeen boys and thirteen girls); there age ranged between 2 to 6 years old. They were classified randomly into two equal groups (A & B). Group (A): received co­nstraint induced movement therapy in addition to selected occupational therapy for 3 months, every day with session duration two hours. Group (B): received only traditional occupational therapy, session duration two hours. Assessment of real-world arm movement (reaching and grasping) was done by pediatric motor activity log-revised (PMAL-R) before and after 3 months of treatment.

Results: Study revealed statistically significant improvement in real-world arm movement in favor to group (A), regarding to hand dominancy  the P-value was Pre (0.540) and Post (<0.001*).The percentage of change in group (A) (Pre and Post training) was (116.79) and in group (B) was (37.50)g. We can conclude that constraint induced movement therapy improved real-world arm movement in spastic hemiparetic cerebral palsied children.

Key Words:   Cerebral palsy, Hemiparesis, Spasticity, Constraint Induced Movement Therapy, Pediatric motor activity Log-Revised, Reaching and Grasping.

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Cite this article: Asmaa Osama Sayed, Hebatallah Mohamed Kamal, Nagham Mohamed Kamal Khalil. CONSTRAINT INDUCED MOVEMENT THERAPY AND REAL-WORLD ARM USE IN CHILDREN WITH HEMIPARESIS. Int J Physiother Res 2017;5(3):2095-2100. DOI: 10.16965/ijpr.2017.149
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