IJPR.2017.111

Type of Article:  Original Research

Volume 5; Issue 2 (April 2017)

Page No.: 1946-1950

DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.16965/ijpr.2017.111

IDENTIFIED AND MOLECULAR CHARACTERIZATION OF THE PATHOLOGY DISORDERS IN FROZEN SHOULDER PATIENTS OF SOUTH INDIANS, INDIA

Venkata Naga Prahalada. Karnati *.

* Lecturer, Department Of Rehabilitation, College Of Applied Medical Sciences, Shaqra University, Shaqra, Saudi Arabia.

Corresponding Author: K.V.N. Prahalada, PhD, PT, Lecturer, Department Of Rehabilitation, College of Applied Medical Sciences, Shaqra University, Shaqra, Saudi Arabia. Phone no.: 00966-534043933 E-Mail: venkat_dr2002@yahoo.co.in

ABSTRACT:

Introduction: Frozen shoulder is a common disease which causes significant morbidity. Frozen shoulder is a common shoulder disorder characterized by pain and gradual loss of active and passive glenohumeral motion that occurs in 2–5% of the general population. However, the etiology and pathophysiologic mechanisms that lead to the development of frozen shoulder are poorly understood, and there is no consensus regarding optimal treatment.

Materials and Methods: Total number of 850 patients were initially recruited during a one year period between January 2014andJanuary 2015;we treated 70 patients with a diagnosis of primary frozen shoulder resistant to conservative treatment by manipulation under anaesthetic and arthroscopic release of the rotator interval, at a mean time from onset of 5 months.

Result and Discussion: Biopsies were taken from this site and histological and immunocytochemical analysis was performed to identify thetypes of cell present. The tissue was characterised by the presence of fibroblasts,proliferating fibroblasts and chronic inflammatory cells. The infiltrate of chronic inflammatory cells was predominantly made up of mast cells, with T cells, B cells and macrophages also present.

Conclusion: In conclusion, arthroscope biopsy material from the rotator interval in patients with frozen shoulder revealed immunocytochemical evidence of both chronic inflammation and proliferative fibrosis, supporting the theory that this is both a chronic inflammatory and a fibrotic condition.Together with the presence of high vascularity and nerve tissue, this inflammation and fibrosis explains why frozen shoulder is such a painful and stiff condition.

Key words: Frozen Shoulder Patients, Immunocytochemical, Manipulation, Rotator interval.

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Cite this article: Venkata Naga Prahalada. Karnati. IDENTIFIED AND MOLECULAR CHARACTERIZATION OF THE PATHOLOGY DISORDERS IN FROZEN SHOULDER PATIENTS OF SOUTH INDIANS, INDIA. Int J Physiother Res 2017;5(2):1946-1950. DOI: 10.16965/ijpr.2017.111
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