IJPR.2017.109

Type of Article:  Original Research

Volume 5; Issue 2 (April 2017)

Page No.: 1937-1945

DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.16965/ijpr.2017.109

SWEEP FREQUENCY OF INTERFERENTIAL CURRENTS THERAPY ATTENUATE FATIGUE OF BICEPS BRACHIA MUSCLE IN NORMAL MALE SUBJECTS: A RANDOMIZED PLACEBO CONTROL TRIAL

Abeer A. Yamany, Ph D., PT.

Assistant Professor, Basic Science Department, Faculty of Physical Therapy, Cairo University, Cairo, Egypt.

Address for Correspondence: Dr. Abeer A. Yamany, Ph D., PT., Assistant Professor, Basic Science Department, Faculty of Physical Therapy, Cairo University, Cairo, Egypt. E-Mail: abeeryamany@gmail.com, dr.abeer_yamany@yahoo.com 

ABSTRACT:

Background: Skeletal muscle fatigue is one of the most common problems encountered in general practice clinic population and sport activities. Interferential currents therapy is widely used by physiotherapists throughout the world to manage a range of musculoskeletal condition.

Objective: To find out the effect of pre-exercise sweep frequency interferential currents therapy on the induced fatigue of biceps brachia muscle in normal healthy untrained male subjects.

Results: A significant difference (p≤0.05) was found between Active and  Placebo interferential currents sessions, when the means ± SD of the two sessions were compared in a terms of pain intensity level , number of submaximal repetitions & time elapsed to reach biceps brachia muscle fatigue in favour of active interferential currents therapy.

Conclusion: The application of sweep frequency interferential current with the used parameter could be effective in delaying the development of skeletal muscle fatigue and enhancing skeletal muscle performance.

Key words: muscle fatigue, interferential currents therapy.

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Cite this article: Abeer A. Yamany, PH D., PT. SWEEP FREQUENCY OF INTERFERENTIAL CURRENTS THERAPY ATTENUATE FATIGUE OF BICEPS BRACHIA MUSCLE IN NORMAL MALE SUBJECTS: A RANDOMIZED PLACEBO CONTROL TRIAL. Int J Physiother Res 2017;5(2):1937-1945. DOI: 10.16965/ijpr.2017.109
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