IJPR.2016.197

Type of Article:  Original Research

Volume 5; Issue 1 (February 2017)

Page No.: 1819-1823

DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.16965/ijpr.2016.197

ASSESSMENT OF REFERENCE VALUES OF CHEST EXPANSION AMONG HEALTHY ADULTS IN PUNE, INDIA

Rajani S. Pagare *1, Ratnaprabha B. Pedhambkar 2. 

*1 Associate Professor (Cardio-Respiratory Physiotherapy), Deccan Education Society’s Brijlala Jindal College Of Physiotherapy, Fergusson Campus, Shivaji nagar, Pune 41105, Maharashtra, India.

2 Associate Professor (Community Medicine), SMBT Institute Of Medical Sciences and Research Center, Dhamangaon, Nashik, Maharashtra, India.

Address for Correspondence:  Dr. Rajani S. Pagare (PT), Associate Professor (Cardio-Respiratory Physiotherapy), Deccan Education Society’s Brijlala Jindal College Of Physiotherapy, Fergusson Campus, Shivaji nagar, Pune 41105, Maharashtra, India.

E-Mail: pagare_rs@yahoo.com

ABSTRACT:

Background:  Chest expansion measurements are used to evaluate the patient’s baseline status, treatment effectiveness, and progression of respiratory diseases with regards to chest wall mobility and respiratory muscle function. It is important to know the reference values of chest expansion of healthy adult Indian population for precise interpretation.

Aim:   To determine reference values of chest expansion for healthy adult Indian population.

Methodology: Total 576 healthy adults participated in this observational study which was carried out at teaching institute and community in Pune city, India. Participants were apparently healthy and non smoking individuals who are recruited by purposive sampling technique. Data was obtained by measuring chest expansion with participants in standing position, elbows slightly flexed so that the hands rested on hips.  Chest was exposed and with the help of an non stretchable inch tape the chest expansion was measured at three levels that is 2nd intercostal space(ICS), 4th intercostal space, and zyphoid process.

Statistical Analysis: Data was analyzed with descriptive and inferential statistics. Level of significance was set at 0.05 α-level.

Results:  576 Participants were recruited for the study.293 were females and 283 were males. The mean age of female participants was 38.43 years (SD=16.52 years) , and the mean age of males were 39.99 years (SD= 17.13 years).  Results showed that  in female participants mean expansion at 2nd ICS was 2.22 inches (SD=0.76 inches), at 4th ICS was 2.22 inches (SD=0.73 inches) and at zyphoid process level was 2.27 inches (SD=0.78 inches) while in male participants mean expansion at 2nd ICS was 2.76 inches (SD=0.90 inches), at 4th ICS was 2.71 inches (SD=0.82 inches) and at zyphoid process level was 2.99 inches (SD=0.87 inches). Chest expansion in male participants’ at all three levels was significantly higher than female participants. There was statistically significant difference between chest expansion at 2nd, 4th ICS and  zyphoid process level in males but there was no such difference found in females. It was also observed that there was age-wise reduction in chest expansion in both males and females.

Conclusion:  It was concluded that male chest expansion was significantly higher than female participants. Study has provided the preliminary baseline for the chest expansion measurements obtained from healthy adult Indian population.

Key words: Chest Expansion, Reference Values, Healthy, Indian Population.

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Cite this article: Rajani S. Pagare, Ratnaprabha B. Pedhambkar. ASSESSMENT OF REFERENCE VALUES OF CHEST EXPANSION AMONG HEALTHY ADULTS IN PUNE, INDIA. Int J Physiother Res 2017;5(1):1819-1823. DOI: 10.16965/ijpr.2016.197
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