IJAR.2017.159

Type of Article:  Case Report

Volume 5; Issue 2.1 (April 2017)

Page No.: 3731-3734

DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.16965/ijar.2017.159

VARIANT POSITION AND COURSE OF THE SUPERIOR CERVICAL CARDIAC BRANCH OF VAGUS NERVE

Gabriel J. Mchonde *1,3, Tomoyuki Saino 2.

*1 Lecturer, Department of Cell Biology and Neuroanatomy, School of Medicine, Iwate Medical University, Iwate, Japan.

2 Professor of Anatomy, Department of Cell Biology and Neuroanatomy, School of Medicine, Iwate Medical University, Iwate, Japan.

3 Lecturer, Department of Anatomy and Histology, School of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Dodoma.

Address for Correspondence: Dr. Gabriel J. Mchonde, PhD, Lecturer, Department of Cell Biology and Neuroanatomy, School of Medicine, Iwate Medical University, Iwate, Japan. Contact No.: +81 80 6293 4529 E-Mail: gmchonde@yahoo.co.uk or mchonde@iwate-med.ac.jp

ABSTRACT

Variations on course and position of vagus nerve and its branches are extremely rare congenital anomaly. This manuscript presents a case of left superior cervical cardiac branch of the vagus nerve looping over the subclavian vein observed during routine dissection of a 72-yeays-old embalmed Caucasian female cadaver. In the same case, the left inferior cervical cardiac branch was taking origin from the superior cervical branch. Understanding the existence and developmental variations of these two cervical cardiac branches is of important in clinical presentations.

Key words: Vagus Nerve, Superior Cervical Cardiac Branch Of Vagus Nerve, Variations.

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Cite this article: Gabriel J. Mchonde, Tomoyuki Saino. VARIANT POSITION AND COURSE OF THE SUPERIOR CERVICAL CARDIAC BRANCH OF VAGUS NERVE. Int J Anat Res 2017;5(2.1):3731-3734. DOI: 10.16965/ijar.2017.159  
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